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A Gas tank for the
Hornby Rocket Locomotive.
Click here for details.

BIX029
Boiler Pressure Regulator.
Click here for details



Forest Classics, sponsors
of Robert Handcock &
Ken Edwards, at the Isle
of Man TT races.
Congratulations to Rob & Ken for winning 5th place at the 2012 Sidecar event!
Visit RJ Road Racing website
Click here

 

Ministeam Atmospheric Engine from 1712

Available as a Ready to Run Model or Kit.

Price: 165.00p Ready to run model

Price: 145.00p Kit

On this working model can be shown the function of the first atmospheric steam engine. With the heat of the spirit burner some water in the boiler starts boiling. The steam is blowing off by the check valve so there is no pressure in the boiler. As soon as a little bit of cold water is injected  into the steam with the spray bottler the steam condenses. A subpressure is coming up in the cylinder and the boiler. Now the atmosphere press down the piston and lift up the beam on the other end. The up and down of the beam operates the water pump connected on a chain deep in the mine.

Ready to run model
Lenght: 355 mm
Width: 90 mm
Height: 255 mm
Weight: 395 g

Blacksmith Thomas Newcomen installed the first practical steam engine in a coal mine in Staffordshire, England in 1712. This was an atmospheric engine capable of pumping water out of mines at much greater depth than previously achieved. Former inventions by people such as Dennis Rapin 1690 and Thomas Savery 1698 were not successful.

Operation
The weight of the pump rods raised the piston to the top of its stroke, the cylinder being filled with steam and then water sprayed into the cylinder to condense the steam causing a vacuum. The pressure of the atmosphere then forced the piston down giving the engine its power stroke. On the other end of the beam was a chain connected to a water pump deep in the mine. The valves on early engines were operated by hand but this was very inefficient and the process was soon automated.

LATEST NEWS.

Ministeam

Atmospheric Engine

Click here for details

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BIX012 Gas Burner Set for the Mamod Steam Wagon

Click here for details

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New Wilesco Stirling Engines
Click
here for details

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New Collectables on

the Used Models page

Click here for details

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Paying by cheque?
It couldn't be easier.

Click here for details

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The Burrell Traction Engine is back!
Click here for details
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Visit our new
Bespoke Models page.

Click here

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NEW!
Two superb
PM Research
Un-machined Kits.
Click here for details.

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NEW!

PM Research Dynamo

Click here for details.

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BIX030 kit

Click here for details.

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